Twenty-Three Days at Sea on Co-op Radio!

Twenty-Three Days at Sea on Co-op Radio!
Saturday, November 7, 2015, 9:00 AM
Co-op Radio, Make a Better World, 100.5 FM

Kimberly Phillips, Director/Curator of Access Gallery will be on air tomorrow morning at 9:00 AM on Co-op Radio’s Make a Better World, to do a follow-up radio show with the inaugural residents of Access Gallery’s travelling artist residency, Twenty-Three Days at Sea. Tune in to hear sound compositions, field recordings and statements from resident artists Elisa Ferrari, Nour Bishouty and Christopher Boyne reflecting on their time at sea.

If you haven’t yet had the opportunity to listen in, you can find our first radio show (broadcast on July 18) in the Make a Better World radio archives, located here

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Born in Italy and based in Vancouver, Elisa Ferrari’s practice aims to uncover disparities between historical documentation and experience, and frequently asks how everyday activities become articulated tactics that might enable critiques of institutional power. She works with archival fragments of text, image, and videography to consider the act and implications of retrieval, in projects that manifest through installation, performance, sound, and photography. Ferrari is a graduate of Emily Carr University of Art and Design’s MAA program. Since 2013 she has served as Events and Exhibitions Curator at VIVO Media Arts Centre and as member of the Crista Dahl Media Library and Archive Committee.

Born in Jordan and currently based in Beirut, Lebanon, Nour Bishouty holds an MFA from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Her practice, which takes shape through installations, images, objects, and text, explores ways that narrative can be wound to fabricate connectivity. Recent work has focused on examining the meanings of belonging or affiliation and its peculiar relationship to place. She is particularly interested in the possibility of a “neutral space” and the implications of producing artwork therein.

Christopher Boyne works from impressions, sentiment, and remembered matter, in a practice that is driven by Williams Carlos Williams’ dictum, “no ideas but in things.” He uses photography (both moving and still) and sculpture to consider how fleeting experience can be distilled through recall into form, and understands his work to function like storytelling, stimulating nostalgia, reflection, reminiscence, and regret. Born in Halifax and now based in Montreal, Boyne is a graduate of Concordia’s MFA program.

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Access Gallery gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Government of British Columbia through the BC Arts Council and BC Gaming, the City of Vancouver, the Burrard Arts Foundation, and our committed donors, members and volunteers.